"Setting out on the voyage to Ithaca you must pray that the way be long, full of adventures and experiences."
- Constantine Peter Cavafy "Ithaca"
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©2008 Ruth Kozak

ARCHIVES: AFRICA



THE WALLED MEDINA OF FES - A STROLL THROUGH THE MIDDLE AGES: Fes El Bali, Morocco
by Rick Neal

I’m in Fes El Bali, Morocco, or the medina as it’s more commonly known. My tour group and I have entered through Bab Boujeloud (The Blue Gate), one of fourteen gates that lead into the old city. Steps away an endless maze of slender roads and enticing alleyways will carry us back in time.


SOUTH AFRICA’S MOTHER CITY ... THE FAIREST CAPE OF THEM ALL: Cape Town, South Africa
by Lynn Smith

Ask any South African which is the most beautiful city in South Africa and the answer will invariably be “Cape Town “– and with good reason. This is the city where I lived for some years and when I visit it again, I realise just how much I have missed its vibrancy.


LIVING MANDELA'S STREET: South Africa
by Ray Mwareya

This is one of South Africa's most famous streets – the only one in the world to have housed two Nobel Prize winners (Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu) – and it has long been a must-see tourist attraction. Every tour to Soweto - Africa's biggest township - stops at Vilakazi Street. There is a famous reason why.


KABALE - LIFTED UP AND DUSTED OFF: Uganda, Africa
by Wayne Gatley

Fine red powder coats the dashboard, floor and seats of the Toyota Ipsum as our team of twelve Vancouverites bounce along the rutted road from the Rwandan border to Kabale. Terraced, fertile fields and banana palms dwarf the one-room, mud houses that cluster at crossroads.


THE SECRET ROMAN RUINS OF TUNISIA: Tunisia
by Hollie Mantle

Why visit Tunisia? For the fresh sea breeze, the even fresher fish, and the balmy blues of the Mediterranean? Prettily packaged as a sun, sea and sand destination, most tourism touts fail to point out the enigmatic pull for the historically or culturally-inclined traveller is the Roman past that lurks beyond the shore.


TWELVE HOURS IN MOROCCO
North Africa - by Ana Ruiz

During one of my annual trips to Spain, I decided to expand and enhance my adventures by visiting the exotic land of Morocco. I reserved a few nights here as I was also planning to visit Gibraltar that was a short bus ride away on the other side of the Spanish town of La Linea de Concepción.

MOROCCAN RHYTHMS: THE GNAOUA WORLD MUSIC FESTIVAL
Morocco, Africa - by Ellen Johnston

Some people will try to tell you that this is not Africa. But when the Gnaoua World Music Festival kicks off every June in Essaouira, on Morocco’s Atlantic coast, its African heart emerges – beating strongly to the rhythms of the drums and three-string basses of the West African slaves who arrived here centuries ago.

A VISIT TO KAREN BLIXEN’S FARM
Kenya, Africa - by Marcia Walker

Often, as a teenager, before drifting off to sleep, the first lines of her novel floated through my mind: “I had a farm in Africa, at the foot of the Ngong Hills.” I read Out of Africa, Karen Blixen’s memoir chronicling the struggles on her Kenyan coffee farm, when I was sixteen. I had not read the book in years but her farm, her Africa, had become part of the geography of my mind. A place forged out of teenage longing.

AN EXOTIC OVERLAND TREK FROM TANGIER TO KENYA
Africa - by Ian Packham

I was on the Kenyan coast at Malindi, having followed the African coast west from Tangier, Morocco’s seedy port of entrance for so many Europeans. I was attempting to complete the first solo and unsupported overland circumnavigation of the continent by public transport, an expedition I had christened Encircle Africa.

LISTENING TO THE WIND AND IMDEZAN IN ESSAOUIRA
Morocco - by Inka Piegsa-quischotte

Not for nothing is Essaouria called ‘City of the Wind’ as well as ‘The Moroccan Woodstock’. History, culture, art, crafts, music and a sin fin of water sport — all these things define the Moroccan port town on the Atlantic which has fascinated as diverse personalities as Winston Churchill, Orson Welles and Jimi Hendrix.

TRAVEL IN THE TIME OF COUP
Madagascar

We were the only guests at Residence LaPasoa, as we would be elsewhere. There’s nothing quite like the threat of cyclones and a coup d’etat to keep the tourists away. It was all quite wonderful for us, but not for those gentle people who lived from tourism. After the coup, the journalists poked their noses into the pub, Ku De Ta, just for the name.

DURBAN - A SLICE OF AFRICA
South Africa

The city of Durban on the north-west coast of South Africa does not feature in most travellers’ plans. It is steamy in summer, allegedly unsafe, a bit dirty, and the beach strip is rowdy. So why go? To experience the “real” urban South Africa and enjoy value for money. Good highways, an excellent game reserve close-by, and warm hospitality are other draws.

RAMBLING AROUND
Marrakech, Morocco

My Moroccan trekking adventure had begun from the beautiful city of Marrakech that nestles like a rose-quartz gemstone near the foothills of the snow-capped High Atlas Mountains. When we arrived at the starting point, we were forced to leave the van walk to the meeting point as the roads were impassable. We had to teeter across foot-wide Berber bridges fashioned out of sticks, suspended over the rushing white water and squeeze behind houses on uneven slippery pathways meant only for goats.

THE RED-ROSE CITY
Marrakech, Morocco

The beautiful Royal city of Marrakech, known as the ‘red city’ because of its pink-tinted buildings, nestles like a rose-quartz gemstone near the rolling foothills of the snow-capped High Atlas Mountains. Marrakech is a spectacle of exotica.

INTO THE SAHARA
A Moroccan Adventure

I tip the jug back with both hands and take a good long swig. A day and a half earlier I walked into the Sahara, just me, a fellow traveler and Ahmed, our guide. Now the three of us have come to this spot, a windswept patch of sand in the shade of an acacia tree, after walking miles without map, compass or GPS.

THE HUNTERS AND THE HUNTED
A Kenya Photo Safari Adventure

Everyone who has a chance to see nearly two million animals on the move has been touched by the magic of this place. What is it that gets under their skin? The urgency of the movement of the wildebeest? The wide open plains? The African light?

MAASAI MARA
Kenya, East Africa


There are so many beautiful places to visit in Kenya, from sea level to mountain tops which can reach up to 10,000 feet or more; and of course there is always Mount Kenya at 17,058 feet, Africa's highest peak with its famous Club and golf course set on the lower shoulder. The Africans you will meet go out of their way to be helpful and friendly. Don't wait too long before travelling to this wordly paradise.