"Setting out on the voyage to Ithaca you must pray that the way be long, full of adventures and experiences."
- Constantine Peter Cavafy "Ithaca"
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©2008 Ruth Kozak

ARCHIVES: NORTH AMERICA



A GLIMPSE OF RUSSIA IN SITKA
by Cynthia J. Notti

Sarah Palin’s infamous quote about seeing Russia from her doorstep has some truth to it. If you visit the remote island of Little Diomede you can see Russia’s island Big Diomede. At a mere 2.3 miles apart, the international dateline runs between the two islands separating Russia from the United States by a whole day. So, in theory, you can travel two minutes to Russia and be 23 hours into the future. I don’t recommend you time travel this way, as it is illegal to cross the Bering Strait.


THE DUPONT MANSIONS
by Kurt Jacobson

Hidden in fragrant forested areas of Delaware and Pennsylvania are three of the famous du Pont family mansions and gardens. These grand estates have something to draw all ages to witness the glorious past of American industrialism when it was fashionable to build a fortune and leave behind an estate for the public’s enjoyment. The three du Pont family members left Nemours, Longwood, and Winterthur to be enjoyed by us common folk, were quite different.


WHITNEY PLANTATION: A Louisiana Museum Dedicated to the Slaves
by Connie Pearson

John Cummings, New Orleans attorney, is determined for us to know the real truth about slavery in the South. When blacks and whites are fighting in the streets over the latest injustice, and the whites make the mistake of saying about the blacks, "They just need to get over it," John Cummings wants us to know what the "it" is. He is dedicating himself and millions of his own money to educating visitors who come to Whitney Plantation, the only plantation in Louisiana with a singular focus on the plight of the slaves.


RECONNECTING WITH THE FRENCH QUARTER'S PAST: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
by John Goodrow

Surrounding the banks of the Mississippi River are aspects of both the past and the present. Looking out into the river, the steamboats Creole Queen and Natchez take visitors from the French Quarter up the river and transport them into the distant past when the river was the highway of exploration. These steamboats use a paddle wheel to propel themselves along the river.


EXPLORING MAYAN TRADING SITES: Mexico
by Marsha Mildon

Standing alone, face to face with a mural depicting the Mayan diving god is one of those Indiana Jones moments that delight me when travelling. My first experience of this rare event happened in March of 2013 in the Xel Ha Architectural Zone. Now I admit up front that when wandering through pre-Hispanic cities in the Americas, I feel a real sense of communication with the original people.

SIGNS OF THE TIME- LAS VEGAS FASCINATING NEON BONEYARD - USA
by Noreen Kompanik

Las Vegas has always oozed glitz and glamour with its multitude of casinos, top entertainers and high rollers. But, no more than in the days of the Rat Pack, Liberace and Elvis, when millions of visitors flocked to a booming Las Vegas – often referred to as “Glitter Gulch” in its heyday. Even today, as people close their eyes and think of Las Vegas, nothing comes to mind more often than those magnificent, pulsing multi-colored neon signs in the middle of the desert that beckoned travelers and guests to fabulous Las Vegas.

EXPLORING TULA’S TOLTEC HISTORY - Mexico
by Zach Lindsey

Tula (sometimes called Tollan) outside the present-day city of Tula de Allende a couple hours away from Mexico City, was once home to the Toltec people. When Toltec potters worked en masse here, a great power had recently fallen, the city of Teotihuacan. Toltec leaders used the power vacuum in the region to become the new leaders.


SHAKER LIFE AT PLEASANT HILL, KENTUCKY
by Wynne Crombie

Shakers starting arriving at Pleasant Hill somewhere around 1805. As early as 1816 they were producing enough surpluses of brooms, preserves, packaged seeds and other products to begin regular trading trips to New Orleans. By the mid-1850s it was home to approximately 600 Shakers occupying 250 buildings and almost 2800 acres of land.


TAKE THE HIGHWAY THAT’S THE BEST TO FLAGSTAFF ARIZONA
by Rick Neal

My heart skips when I spot the familiar road sign that leads to my hotel, and not just because I’m relieved to finally be here. For the next few days I’ll be residing on the Main Street of America: Route 66. Spanning nearly 2,500 miles from Chicago to Santa Monica, California, this iconic roadway is one of America’s most revered highways. That night I sleep like a newborn, waking only once to the melancholic trill of a distant train whistle.


A TOWN OF HISTORY, CUISINE, AND CREATIVITY: Hillsborough, North Carolina
by Connie Pearson

Do you hear them? As you stroll the streets and wander the cemeteries of Hillsborough, do you hear the echoes of the past? The clip-clop of horse-drawn carriages. The restless whisperings turning to impassioned cries of revolutionaries wanting freedom from England’s tyranny. The speeches of the brave men willing to sign that defiant Declaration.


CANFIELD CASINO: New York, USA
by Theresa St. John

The Saratoga Springs Historical Museum and Casino is located in downtown Canfield, in the center of picturesque Congress Park. Catering only to the very rich and very famous, the Casino drew the most elite from all over the world. Men who might gamble what could be hundreds of thousands of dollars a night.


FRIENDS AMONG STRANGERS: Georgia, USA
by Mickey Kulp

Recently, I traveled to Fort Yargo State Park to meet some members of the Fort Yargo Living History Society, a group of volunteers who are dedicated to using period tools, clothing, and techniques to give visitors a peek at Georgia frontier life in the 1790s. They strive for accuracy, and they mean it.


DISCOVERING AN OLD FASHIONED GERMAN CHRISTMAS:The Mountains of Washington State
by Edward Quan

Want to experience an old fashion German Christmas; yet don’t have the time or resources to fly the family to Europe this December? Consider visiting the Leavenworth Christmas Lighting Festival located in the heart of the Cascade Mountains of Washington State. Where over half a million Christmas lights with an abundance of holiday cheer sparkles in American’s Ultimate Holiday Town.


A FEISTY SOUTHERN LADY FINDS KINSHIP AND INSPIRATION FROM DENVER ICON MOLLY BROWN: Denver, Colorado
by Connie Pearson

Margaret (Molly) Brown died at the age of 65 – the exact age that I am now – but she made such a big splash in her ocean of influence that surviving the sinking of the Titanic was only a small piece of her powerful life story.I chose to take a taxi from my downtown hotel and visit the Molly Brown House Museum.


ANDERSONVILLE CEMETERY – “IS THIS HELL?” - Georgia, USA
by Hannah Murray

Andersonville, a former Prisoner of War site for Union soldiers, currently sits on Highway 49, almost in the middle of nowhere. The park operates the National Prisoner of War Museum, a unique and fascinating place that is designed to resemble a prison itself.


UNCOVERING HISTORY – THE PIONEER STORE MUSEUM: Chloride, NM, USA
by Bob Hazlett

The store began serving the Chloride mining community in 1880. In 1923, it closed and was boarded up with everything inside. In 1988, when the boards came off, they found a building filled with bats and rats, 75 years of excrement, and underneath it all, the makings of the Pioneer Store Museum.


A WEEKEND ROAD-TRIP TO THE SKAGIT VALLEY: Washington State, USA
by W. Ruth Kozak

A friend and I set off on a weekend road trip across the US border from Vancouver BC to visit some historic locations in Washington State. Our fun-filled road trip lasted four days and every moment of it was a special delight. If you are visiting the Pacific Northwest it’s worth taking the trip.


THREE GENERATIONS ENJOY SEDONA: Arizona
by Darlene Foster

The town provides a relaxed atmosphere with a creative flair. The soothing terracotta buildings blend in perfectly with the surroundings. The town centre displays samples of local paintings, sculptures and carvings. Wandering the streets of Sedona is like walking through an outdoor art gallery.


THE BEAUTY OF THE ANASAZI IN MESA VERDE: Colorado, USA
by Luke Maguire Armstrong

Mesa Verde is a place where natural beauty mixes with history in a uniquely dramatic way. One finds the earthy splendor of the American Southwest and a window to one of North American’s most unique groups of indigenous people—the Anasazi. Why do we live in houses when we could be living on the sides of cliffs?


THE SANDS OF SAVARY: British Columbia, Canada
by Glen Cowley

We crested the knoll and were rewarded. Below us ran drift-wood artistry crafted along the tanned body of a broad beach welcoming the incoming tide. Not a soul in sight. Welcome to Savary Island; originally named “Ayhus” by the Sliammon (Tla'amin) First Nation people, meaning double-headed serpent.


A VISIT TO HORTON HOUSE, A REMNANT OF AMERICA’S HISTORICAL PAST: Jekyll Island, Georgia USA
by Theresa St. John

During my recent stay on Jekyll Island, the hotel manager asked what I was interested in doing while vacationing there. I explained that I loved history and wanted to learn about anything historical on the island. Horton House was on the top of his list.


A HISTORIC STROLL THROUGH STEINBECK’S CANNERY ROW: California, USA
by Leslie Jones

If you head to Monterey’s historic Cannery Row in the middle of the week (preferably during the off-season), you might turn a bit nostalgic especially if you are a Steinbeck fan. Visuals from Cannery Row, Sweet Thursday and frequent mentionings of Doc Rickett’s marine laboratory still remain. These are special characters and places I fell in love with a very long time ago.


VIVA YBOR! PLACE OF HISTORY, CUISINE AND CIGARS: Florida, USA
by Karen Pacheco

We’re not in Cuba. We’re in Ybor (pronounced EE-bor) an historic, multi-cultural neighbourhood of Tampa, Florida, former flourishing cigar centre of the world. While it’s not the rich environment it once was during the late 1890’s to 1929; this community has evolved into a delightful mix of culture, cuisine and history.


RETRACING THE FOOTSTEPS OF ERNEST HEMINGWAY: Key West Florida, USA
by Edward Quan

My journey to experience more of Hemingway’s legendary life began with a flight to sun filled Miami, home to some of the most beautiful white sand beaches in America. The Ernest Hemingway Home and Museum, located in Old Town district of Key West Florida, is the farthest southern point in the continental United States.


THE TOWN TOO SPIRITED TO DIE:Jerome, Arizona, USA
by Noreen Kompanik

For over one hundred and thirty years thousands of folks have come to Jerome. Many left their mark and some may have never left. Jerome resides in a time warp, where the past and present co-exist. The present struggles to take root while the past never quite lets go. And like the spirits that meander about, the town’s spirit also refuses to die.


HOW LONDON BRIDGE CAME TO LAKE HAVASU: Arizona, United States
by Lesley Hebert

In 1967 I was working in London. To me, London Bridge was an unremarkable piece of masonry blackened by 136 years of coal smoke belching from London chimneys but I found the idea of selling the bridge quite bizarre. Who on earth, I wondered, would buy this dirty pile of old stones?


FIGHTING IN THE NUDE - PREFERENCE OR NECESSITY? Pagaso Springs, Colorado USA
by Karin Leperi

Albert H. Pfeiffer, a European immigrant and a comrade of Kit Carson, was a fur trapper, pioneer, soldier, and Indian agent, born in Germany on October 7, 1822.At the age of twenty-two, he immigrated to America, settling in St. Louis, Missouri in 1844. Seeking a more western experience, he moved on to Santa Fe, New Mexico Territory.


NEW ORLEANS TODAY, AFTER THE HURRICANE: Louisiana, USA
by Larry Zaletel

New Orleans is known for many things: seafood, i.e. crawfish, shrimp, crab and also for its music and musicians. The New Orleans area has the most home grown musicians in the country. However if New Orleans is known for anything it is a slogan and an attitude of, “Laissez les bons temps rouler, let the good times roll.”


A CLEAN SWEEP: Victor, Colorado USA
by Dedra Montoya

“I think we’re kinda stuck in 1900,” says the owner of the Victor Trading Company, Sam Morrison. Walking into the Victorian building in the center of the little gold-mining town of Victor, Colorado, (where time seems to have stood still for over a century), you get the sense you’re wandering back in time.


EXPERIENCE FALL IN VERMONT AND NEW HAMPSHIRE
USA - by Bram Reusen

The fall season is an exceptional time of year in New England, a short season that draws in thousands of so-called leaf-peepers. Visitors can enjoy the magnificence of soaring mountains or the quietness of a countryside dotted with picturesque farmsteads, barns, covered bridges and sugarhouses.


PITTSBURGH’S POSITIVELY OFFBEAT GEMS
Pennsylvania, United States - by Roy A. Barnes

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was once synonymous with steel and the home of some of the most iconic barons of finance and industry. But even as the steel industry in America has declined and the barons of generations past are no more, the city can boast one of the greatest collections of offbeat attractions of any major city.


TOURS AND LORE OF THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST
United States of America - by Sharron Calvin

Imagine ... Indians singing and dancing around a roaring camp fire or planting seeds by the light of a full moon. These visions and more were felt during my visit to Chaco Canyon National Historical Park, Canyon De Chelly (pronounced shay), National Monument and Casa Malpais Archaeological Park.


LAISSEZ LE BON TEMPS ROULEZ!
The French Quarter Festival in New Orleans - by Paul Norton

I have been inexplicably drawn to its music and culture of New Orleans for most of my adult life. It’s a fascinating city, full of contradictions such as the enthusiastic celebrations of God and Satan that surround you all the time. It was so jam-packed with music, colourful characters and unforgettable oddities that it was impossible to see enough. My one regret? We only set aside one week to see this place.


A STEP BACK IN TIME
Galena, Illinois USA - by Wynne Crombie

Galena is a National Historic Center with 3,500 residents. Its downtown brick-fronted buildings look much the same as they did 150 years ago…undeniably, part of the charm. The Historic District encompasses 85 percent of the city. of Galena and includes more than 800 properties.


OF WATER AND ROCK: A ROAD TRIP THROUGH THE ROCKIES
Western Canada - by Glen Cowley

It has been called the most beautiful drive in the World. And it is but a small part of the God's carven world of the seven Canadian National and B. C. Provincial Parks hugging the Rocky Mountains' Great Divide.


PEACE AND TRANQUILITY IN TAOS PUEBLO
New Mexico, USA - by Darlene Foster

The Taos Pueblo, located at the base of the picturesque Sangre de Cristo Mountain Range, is considered to be the oldest continuously inhabited community in the USA and has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site and a National Historic Landmark.

CROSSING PATHS WITH A PRINCE
Cody, Wyoming - by Karin Leperi

It’s not often in my life that I can say I had a brush with a Prince. In fact, now that I look back on a lifetime of worldly experiences, I can’t ever remember running into royalty. Well, as it turns out, that’s exactly what happened on a recent trip of mine to Cody, Wyoming. To be more exact, I crossed paths with the Prince of Monaco while visiting Buffalo Bill Cody’s old stomping grounds in the town that bears his name - Cody, Wyoming.

WINNIPEG’S HISTORIC FRENCH QUARTER
Canada - by Donna Janke

St. Boniface was founded in 1818 with the establishment of a Catholic mission. It became part of Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1972. Home to one of the largest French-Canadian communities outside the province of Québec, its rich history includes voyageurs, fur traders, European settlers, Catholic missionaries, rebellion, and the birth of the province of Manitoba.

A CRUISE AROUND VICTORIA’S HISTORIC HARBOUR
British Columbia, Canada - by Glen Cowley

“Busiest float plane airport in North America” Captain Bob proclaimed as we watched a Harbour Air float plane whine its way to a graceful takeoff and bend its nose to the sky. And busy is an apt word to describe Victoria, B.C.'s inner harbour, especially as viewed from the belly of a many-windowed ferry operated by Victoria Harbour Ferry.

WHERE PICTURES SPEAK MORE THAN A THOUSAND WORDS
Key West, Florida USA - by Roy A. Barnes

A setting sun has this ability to captivate the eyes of its admirers. I must say that the two I saw in Key West really gripped me so unexpectedly, for I never imagined sunsets being that impacting. This place does seem to be the “land of the eternal summer,” for others who live in the Northern Hemisphere were retreating to the warmth of their domiciles while I was alone with my thoughts in the open waters.

PAULINE JOHNSON: A MOHAWK PRINCESS POET
Vancouver, Canada - by W. Ruth Kozak

If you visit my city, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, you are sure to spend some time in one of Vancouver’s unique tourist attractions, Stanley Park. The park became the favorite haunt of an Indian princess/poet, Pauline Johnson, the first Native Indian to be published in Canada. Her book “The White Wampum” gained her high literary standing.

EXPLORING THE FLORIDA KEYS VIA KAYAK
United States of America - by Roy A. Barnes

The Florida Keys are made up of some 1,700 islands. From Miami to Key West, this archipelago stretches over 150 miles alone. It’s here where I found some unique saltwater kayaking opportunities stretching from Cow Key to Key Largo.

ROAD TRIPPIN' WITH TOM & HUCK
(The Mark Twain Tour) U.S.A. - by Mike Marino

Think Twain, think Hannibal, Missouri. Think Twain, think Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. All of the various places that have been ingrained in literature and carved into the fertile imagination of young boys and girls since the publication of these two books, are based on real life characters of their creator, Mark Twain.

SHADES OF THE BARBARY COAST
San Francisco, USA - by Troy Herrick

San Francisco never ceases to entertain. But the city hasn’t always been this refined. Between 1849 and 1917, the city enjoyed a raucous reputation known as “the Barbary Coast” period. The Barbary Coast, the original red light district, acquired its name around 1860 from the coast of North Africa where Arab pirates attacked Mediterranean ships.

THERE IS EITHER LIBERTY OR DEATH, AND IF I CANNOT HAVE ONE, I WILL HAVE THE OTHER
Boone Hall Plantation, South Carolina USA - by Hannah Murray

As a British person travelling in the Deep South, a new world of history, food and adventure lay before me. I wanted to see as many historical sites as possible within my six-week trip, and Boone Hall Plantation was in my top five places to see. The best destinations are those that stir the soul, pull at the heartstrings or blow us away with their beauty. For me, Boone Hall managed to do all three.

HISTORIC NEIGHBORHOODS OF SPOKANE
Washington State, USA - by Roy A. Barnes

There’s more to a city than its centrally-located tourist attractions. To really get intimate with a city means exploring some of the neighborhoods that have helped shaped its history through walking its streets, visiting its notable homes, and taking in an atmosphere that allows one to imagine being in another century.

GHOSTS OF THE AMERICAN WEST
Montana, USA - by Laurie Gough

Rather than the tame goings-on of the last couple of centuries, it’s the little-known facts about Lewis and Clark and their expedition through unmapped Missouri River wilderness which guide Mike Nottingham loves to discuss. Here in Virgelle, Montana, river stories of the past are just some of the surprises that await you.

NEW YEARS AT THE TOURNAMENT OF ROSES PARADE
Pasadena, California USA - by Larry Zalatel

Known as America's New Year Celebration, the annual Tournament of Roses Parade features spectacular floral floats that are completely covered with natural materials. According to parade rules, every inch of the floats must be covered with flowers or plant material, most of it applied by volunteers in the last weeks of December.

EXPLORING DOWNTOWN SPOKANE'S HISTORIC SPOTS
Spokane, Washington USA - by Roy A. Barnes

As a mining, agriculture, and forestry hub, beginning in the late 19th century, Spokane has played an important role in shaping the Pacific Northwest, despite being overshadowed by other cities in the region like Seattle and Portland. But I found that the city offers so much colorful history and character, especially in downtown.

RAILWAY TO THE MOON
New England, USA - by Glen Cowley

Since 1869 this powerful little steam engine and its kin have been pushing tourists three miles up to the wind-blown summit of Mount Washington, New Hampshire and easing them back again. At its crown demon winds howl unfettered, peeling tears from eyes better than cut onions. On a clear day you can see four states with a view limited only by the curvature of the earth.

CHESLEA HIGH LINE: A GREEN SPACE ABOVE THE REST
New York City, USA - by Anna Marie D’Angelo

If you haven’t been to New York City in a few years, chances are you haven’t taken a delightful walk along the Cheslea High Line in Manhattan’s lower west side. Opened in 2009, the linear elevated park, officially called The High Line, was built on the remains of a derelict freight train route near the Hudson River.

KEEPING THE LIGHT
Wisconsin, USA - by Megan Kopp

So treacherous were the waters where Green Bay meets the open body of Lake Michigan, that it was given the name 'Porte des Morts' or 'Death's Door.' The peninsula that would eventually become Door County has 300 miles (483 km) of shoreline. Dotting these shores with life-saving lighthouses to guide shipping vessels in the late 1800s and early 1900s was essential.

MAKING MUSIC IN CARLSBAD
California, USA - by Karin Leperi

When I found out that the Museum of Making Music was about a stone’s throw from Legoland California Resort & Sea Life Aquarium in Carlsbad, I decided to make some time and check out the story on making music. A hidden jewel, it’s a treasure trove of a century of musical instruments and innovations that shaped American popular music.

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN
Fountain City, Tennessee, USA - by Melanie Harless

I did not attend Fountain City’s funeral, but a friend told me about it later and said it was quite an event that ended with the playing of “Taps.” I lived in Fountain City from the time I was nine until I got married and left, so I consider it my hometown. This trip was a sentimental journey for me.

DISCOVERING QUADRA ISLAND
British Columbia, Canada - by Glen Cowley

July 30, 1792. This day the long finger of Columbus reached Quadra Island. Be the legacy fair or foul it changed the island forever. The modern day explorer ideally comes to this island to observe, learn and respect people, culture and environment knowing from history what can transpire when we fail to do so. It is not a place to hurry.

A WAR WAS FOUGHT IN THIS PEACEFUL CANYON
Royal Gorge Route, Colorado USA - by Glen Brewer

Beneath the suspension bridge, the canyon is so narrow and the walls so steep that a place for railroad tracks seemed impossible. The river simply must occupy the entire canyon bottom. But in 1879 a “hanging bridge” was devised and built to allow the tracks to pass through the narrow space suspended above the rushing water. This bridge still serves today.

AN UNDISCOVERED COUNTRY – FIFTEEN ACRES OF IVY GREEN CEMETERY AND 150 YEARS OF HISTORY
Bremerton, WA, USA - by Mike Howard

I’ve travelled extensively over the last few decades, but have treated my own back yard a bit cavalierly – commuting to work in the early hours and not getting home until dark. Now that I’ve retired, I am constantly astounded by local treasures hidden in plain sight. The fifteen acres were surprisingly easy to cover – and I pretty much visited every grave site, without success.

THE PLACE WHERE LIBERTY WAS FOUGHT
Worcester, England - by W. Ruth Kozak

The picturesque city of Worcester in Worcestershire, the West Midlands of England, is a modern city with a fascinating past. From its early beginnings as a Roman fort in the first century, down through the ages Worcester has been noted as an important centre of British history, known as ‘the place where Liberty was fought’.

KEEPING AUSTIN WEIRD
Texas, USA - by Paul Norton

More than one resident proclaimed to us “I’m not from Texas … I’m from Austin”. It gradually dawned on me that this is more than a cute turn of phrase. The reason why we love Austin so much is because it’s so different from the rest of Texas. It’s like a little Democrat island in the middle of a great big Republican sea.

EXPLORING THE BADLANDS
Alberta, Canada by Robin Konstabaris

In front of the Dinosaur Museum there was a T-Rex so large we could climb steps inside and six or seven people could gaze out of it's mouth for a sweeping view of the town with the Badlands behind it. “This is the last thing you would see if eaten by the giant T-Rex of Drumheller,” I said.

OUR OREGON COAST ROAD TRIP
USA by Chris Hiebert

There’s a chill in the air. A river of rain washes down the living room window. Curled up in front of the fire a hot cup of Earl Grey tea in hand, Sandra asks “What if we return to the Oregon Coast? Remember the beautiful sunsets and that first glimpse of the ocean through the trees?” she adds. “And of course the people we met.” I had to agree those are the joys of travel.

CIVIL WAR HISTORY COMES ALIVE
Norfolk, Virginia, USA by Roy A. Barnes

Fort Norfolk goes back to the Revolutionary War era. It was abandoned by the Rebels in 1862, but not before supplying the ammo used by the Confederates’ CSS Merrimac against the USS Monitor in the great ironclad battle. In the midst of a sunny, breezy day, I could feel the presence of those past centuries long gone.

OLD MISSION SANTA BARBARA, QUEEN OF MISSIONS
California, USA by W. Ruth Kozak

Disembarking from the trolley, I stand in awe as I observe the impressive building with its twin bell towers and the imposing architecture that combines Moorish, Mexican, Chumash Indian and Spanish design. In the mosaic-paved entryway a Moorish fountain dating back two hundred years burbles with a spray of water.

FORT WILLIAM HISTORICAL PARK - WHERE HISTORY HAPPENS EVERY DAY
Ontario, Canada by Ron Kness

Fort William is a 40-building reconstructed fur trading distribution post setting on 25 acres. Operating from 1803 to 1821, this was the Northwest Company’s inland headquarters and distribution center where canoe brigades would come in from the remote outposts each July heavily ladened with baled furs.

THE KISPIOX VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL
British Columbia, Canada - by Glen Cowley

The hills are alive with music in North Central British Columbia. Wending through forests, echoing off mountains and flowing with river and stream; music and song find perfect harmony in a setting inspiring even in its silence. The Kispiox Valley Music Festival was celebrating its 18th annual birthday but for us it was experience number one.

FROM ANCIENT SPOTTED HORSES TO THE AMERICAN APPALOOSA
A Journey from the Caves Of France to The Hills and Prairies Of Palouse - by Karin Leperi

Up until about a year ago, archaeologists and scientists were divided about what the spotted horse sketches actually represented. Did the dappled horses represent mystical creatures conjured up during lucid dreaming? Were the cave paintings symbolic images with some religious significance or purpose for these ancient cave dwellers?

EXPLORING CATALINA ISLAND
California, U.S.A. - by Gregg LaLiberte

If you have ever wanted to visit an island off the coast of California, and Hawaii is just too far (and perhaps not in the budget), Santa Catalina Island is an ideal second choice. All in all, Catalina Island is a wonderful place to visit, offering a unique aspect of Southern California quite unlike any other.

EXPLORING O. HENRY'S AUSTIN
USA, Texas - by Laura Roberts

Located in Austin, Texas, the O. Henry Museum is an unassuming bungalow situated just a short walk from the city's modern glass convention center and its shiny new metro rail service. The cream-colored Queen Anne style cottage at 409 East 5th Street resembles many of Austin’s quaint and cozy historic homes, but the major difference is that a famous writer once lived here.

A SOUTHERN USA CIVIL RIGHTS TOUR
United States of America - by Taylor Anderson

For a vacation that touches your heart, stirs your imagination and leaves you with unforgettable memories of delicious food and friendly people, it’s hard to beat a trip through Alabama, moving on to Washington D.C. The fifty-four miles that separate Selma, Birmingham and Montgomery Alabama are filled with sites significant to the civil rights movement of the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s.

A TALL TALE
THE STORY OF PAUL BUNYAN
Minnesota, U.S.A. - by Norman A. Rubin

The story of Paul Bunyan, together with Babe the Blue Ox richly rooted in history and tradition, is now considered to be one of America's greatest folk tales; and so be it. This legendary superman and woodsman, hero of the early logging days, was born in Bemidji, Minnesota.

REMEMBER THE MAINE
U.S.A. - by Glen Cowley

The long sliver of Atlantic coastline from the New Hampshire border to Portland, Maine encompasses a diversity of images; the refined and manicured, the tacky funlands, the rocky outcrops and historic villages.

THE NATIONAL PARK CONNECTIONS
United States of America - by Robert Hale

This is an interesting anniversary year. The US National Park Idea (America's Best Idea) is 140 years old; Amtrak is 40 years old. They are connected! The Santa Fe, Union Pacific, Southern Pacific, Northern Pacific, Great Northern, Burlington, Milwaukee Road, Chicago and Northwestern all had stops adjacent to, or relatively near national parks.

HISTORICAL CANADIAN LIGHTHOUSES
Canada - by Norman Rubin

Visiting and photographing lighthouses, even collecting replicas of them are popular hobbies for many enthusiasts. In some locations, lighthouses have become popular travel destinations in themselves and the buildings are maintained as tourist attractions. Canada with its long rugged shore is an excellent country for enthusiasts to visit and photograph its historic lighthouses, the national heritages of the land.

A MOUNTAIN ADVENTURE - HOT ROCKS
British Columbia & Alberta, Canada

There are not enough "a's" in "aaaaaaaaah" to impart the soothing sensation of slow immersion into a mountain hung hot springs pool. The Kootenay Rockies of British Columbia 800 kilometre Hot Springs Circle Tour affords travellers a week-long, hot-springs-per-day experience.

HAIDA GWAII - LEARNING ABOUT THE CULTURE IN HAIDA LAND
Canada
Queen Charlotte Islands

Here I was on a late morning sitting on the front porch of a beach front property with a commanding ocean view. I had stayed the previous night inside my friend's family modest if not slightly dilapidated seaside bungalow. As I sipped a murky stale coffee I tried to analyze why everything appeared topsy-turvy to me since arrival at Masset Indian reserve, Queen Charlotte Island.

LITTLE TOWN WITH RICH HERITAGE
Rogersville, USA

The intriguing past of Rogersville, Tennessee begins in the late eighteenth century. A good place to begin enjoying this history is Crockett Springs Park located in the central part of town off W. Main Street, accessible from Rogers Street or Rogan Road. Here one will find Rogers Cemetery where Davy Crockett's grandparents are buried.

AN HERITAGE CHRISTMAS AT BURNABY VILLAGE MUSEUM
Canada, British Columbia

Warm Christmas cheer greeted me and made it a pleasant winter's outing when I visited the Burnaby Heritage Museum. From the blazing coloured lights to the Victorian Christmas decorations I was quickly transported into the spirit of the Holiday Season.

THE NAVAJO’S LONG WALK
Arizona, United States

You can tell that thousands of Navajo Indians have walked up this canyon. Years and years of constant steps have worn natural footholds up and down the orange walls. They look as if they've been intricately carved. And in a way, they had been."Could you ever get lost up here?" Amanda asked Calvin, our sure-footed Navajo guide."No." He answered.

HAWAII'S OUTER SHORES
United States of America

My wife Annie and I are immersing ourselves in the history and culture of Hawaii's less crowded "outer" shores, far from the lights and traffic of Waikiki. It is like opening a Russian doll, so many hidden dimensions ar revealed. We keep getting vivid glimpses of long-vanished ways of life.

THE LEGEND OF THE PHILADELPHIA STORY
The Movie That Saved Katharine Hepburn’s Career

The Philadelphia Story was shot in only eight weeks during the summer of 1940. Hepburn's gamble had paid off. Almost overnight she was back on top of the Hollywood hierarchy, a position she would occupy for the remainder of her sixty year career. She went on to garner a total of twelve Academy Award nominations, and is the only four time Oscar winner for a lead role.

EXPERIENCING HORSE RACING CULTURE
Louisville, Kentucky

Kentucky and the city of Louisville are to horses what North Carolina is to NASCAR. I got a chance to see some of the inner workings of Churchill Downs while meeting some very famous world class athletic celebrities of the four-footed kind, then relaxed at a horse racing-themed bar.

IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF CAPTAIN GEORGE VANCOUVER AND THE CANNIBAL SPIRIT ON QUADRA ISLAND
British Columbia, Canada

There are not many places on the Pacific Coast where we know for certain Captain George Vancouver walked, but this is one
the beach of Cape Mudge at the southern tip of Quadra Island, across Discovery Passage from Campbell River, British Columbia.

THE MAGIC CAPITAL OF THE WORLD
Colon, Michigan

Greg Bordner smiles as he recalls how Colon, Michigan, a sleepy Midwest village surrounded by Amish farms, became The Magic Capital of the World and home to one of the largest magic events on the planet. The entire town celebrates its heritage during the festival.

WOOFING - THE NEW WAY TO WORK AND TRAVEL
Alaska

World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms is a website that matches farmers with willing workers. The farmers receive free help around their property, while the “woofers” get a free bed and meals (usually healthy organic food), a unique experience, and if they’re lucky, a primer in small-scale organic farming practices.

WHERE HISTORY HAPPENS EVERYDAY
Fort William Historical Park, Canada

Fort William is a 40-building reconstructed fur trading distribution post setting on 25 acres. Operating from 1803 to 1821, this was the Northwest Company’s inland headquarters and distribution center where canoe brigades would come in from the remote outposts each July heavily ladened with baled furs.

THE MEMORIAL HALL MUSEUM
Historic Deerfield, Massachusetts

A 'Living Museum' is a cultural institution that is dedicated to conserving our common heritage for the benefit of all generations, past, present and future. The Memorial Hall Museum, the oldest in the country, is a fine example of a living museum. It chronicles the history and reflects the history of New England.

DIRTY DAN’S LEGACY
Fairhaven, Washington

Founded in the 1880’s by Dirty Dan Harris as he was known because of his somewhat less then scrupulous dealings, we only discovered this charming town a few years ago. Since then we have returned on numerous occasions. Fairhaven Village is an easy day trip from anywhere in Metro Vancouver by car or from Vancouver by train. If you are travelling from Victoria B.C. this historic town is a three-hour Washington State passenger ferry ride away.

BOWERS MUSEUM
TREASURES IN THE SANDS OF TIME
Santa Ana, California

Sometimes you don’t have to go far to find yourself in another time, almost in another world. Last July, I viewed the Secrets of the Silk Road Exhibition at the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California and stepped 3800 years into the past to the days of life along the Silk Road.

FIND STARS AND STRAWBERRIES
Dayton, Tennessee

I decided recently that it was time to go to Dayton as a tourist and found it to be a unique little town that is preserving its historical heritage. I turned off Tennessee Highway 27 in Rhea County at the entrance arches and lampposts marking Dayton as a Historic Main Street Community, one of twenty-two such designated communities in the state of Tennessee. Just inside the entrance is the Chamber of Commerce. I stopped there and found a pamphlet with a walking tour of a six block downtown district with historical places marked with Appalachian Quilt Trail Stars.

KNOCKING ON WISCONSIN’S DOOR
Door County, Wisconsin

The area received its name from the French, when it was dubbed Porte de Mortes (or “Door to Death”), because of the treacherous strait between the peninsula and the islands off its northern end, which today is the resting place of countless sunken ships. Door County also boasts multiple white sand beaches that line Lake Michigan.

CELEBRATING THE ROYAL WEDDING
Victoria, BC

It was a historic Royal Wedding weekend celebrated in style in British Columbia’s capital city, Victoria, named for Queen Victoria. Victoria is one my favourite local destinations, so my friend and I decided to visit this historic West Coast city to celebrate the royal event.

PRESERVING HISTORY
Cleveland, Tennessee

The growing city of Cleveland, Tennessee has a population of over 38,000. In late 2007, it was ranked nationally as one of 50 best places to raise a family by BusinessWeek.com. Also, Forbes Magazine found Cleveland to be one of the top communities in the nation to do business. While a good place to do business and raise a family, it would hardly seem to be a destination for history buffs, but the town has made preserving history a priority.

THE MYSTERIOUS GREAT SERPENT MOUND
Ohio, USA

The rolling hills of Southern Ohio surround me in all directions. My husband and I travel along the secluded wilderness below the Great Serpent Mound. From head to tail the Serpent measures 1,330 feet in length and three feet in width.

THE GHOSTS OFF THE MISSISSIPPI
Alton, Illinois

Gary Hawkins knows how to catch a ghost. Yes, he boldly claims that he knows how to snatch one by the limbs, and make them screech, howl and fight until he decides to let them go. Hawkins sure gets plenty of practice too, because he resides in one of the most haunted places in America.

WONDERLAND OF ROCKS AND TREES
Joshua Tree National Park, California

I’ve never been much interested in rocks. I’ve always seen them as lumps of matter, squatting sullenly in the earth. So when I started on a journey through the Joshua Tree National Park, near Palm Springs, California, I never expect to be so excited and amazed by the rocks found there.

GUNG HAY FAT CHOY - CELEBRATING THE LUNAR NEW YEAR IN CHINATOWN
Vancouver, Canada

A West Coast mist that quickly turned into an icy downpour didn’t dampen the enthusiasm of the spectators or stop the lions and dragons from dancing in this year’s Chinese New Year’s parade. From marching bands, politicians, police, banner waving martial arts groups and pretty dancing girls, there was entertainment for all ages.

EXPERIENCE THE HISTORY
Louisville, Kentucky

In Louisville, Kentucky, I found some of the city’s best gems using a variety of transport means, and in the process fulfilled one childhood wish. From flying in a classic biplane to riverboating on the Ohio River, my getting travel-intimate with this city was made all the more fun and adventurous.

NORTH BY NORTHWEST
Before James Bond, There was The Man in Lincoln’s Nose

Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest remains one of the most entertaining motion pictures of all time. It pops up repeatedly on lists of Greatest American Movies and thanks largely to Turner Classic Movies, is possibly the most televised of all Hitchcock films. Odd then, that one of his most famous pictures started as a vague notion about a guy hanging from Abraham Lincoln’s nose.

BAFFIN ISLAND! O CANADA!
Nunavit, Canada

I have always dreamed of travelling to the Arctic North, a land full of wonder, mystery and adventure. Somehow, I felt a “calling” in my heart. I often wonder, maybe in my past life I was an Inuit or a polar bear, yearning to return back to where I belong? I finally decided to realize my dream. So I pack all my heavy winter clothing and set off to Baffin Island.

HAUNTING TOURS IN AMERICAN CITIES
Chicago, New Orleans, Hollywood, New York and Savannah

Haunting tours to five US cities noted for their outstanding scandalous, murderous and strange behavior by a few of their illustrious and nefarious citizens – their ghosts and spirits still haunt the byways and thoroughfares of the cities. On a tour for the curious folk, the skeptics who will visit the haunted sites in the cities of America could make them a real believer in ghosts.

EXPLORING PUEBLO PAST
San Diego, California

As you walk from the paved trolley stop into arid, sandy “Old Town” San Diego isn’t just a change of terrain, it‘s a step across the sands of time into the early 19th century when the settlement was in transition from Mexican pueblo to American frontier town.

DOING THE LA DE DA - Detroit’s Hamtramck Neighborhood
Following Big Daddy down the street playing “Doing the La De Da” on the accordion was just one part of a fun-filled morning I spent in Hamtramck, the city of 25,000 surrounded by metropolitan Detroit. It is just a short distance from the center of Detroit and the cultural center of the Detroit’s Polish community.

HOMES OF SPLENDOR, SPEED, AND SPIRIT
Daytona Beach, Florida

Daytona Beach is known nationally as hosting the famed Daytona 500 and has been a hotspot for young hedonistic Spring Breakers to kick up their heels. Yet this place is more than somewhere to get a nice tan or to escape from the wintry climates.

FLORIDA
Miami's Indian History

You can’t visit Miami without being reminded of the Seminoles, the Miccosukee and the Tequesta, South Florida’s native American ancestors. What better pastime for a rainy Friday afternoon than leaving the glamour of South Beach behind and diving into the exciting history of the Indians with a visit to the Historical Museum of Southern Florida.

BURN AWAY THE WINTER BLUES
Whitehorse, Yukon

Torches are being held high. Banners and tall effigies depicting both Father Winter and the dragon of Spring are flowing into the night’s festivities as if alive. The sun has now settled into an intense cobalt blue creating a backdrop for the stark black trees lining the hills. I am in awe.

FLAVOR OF NEW ORLEANS IN TWENTY FOUR HOURS
Louisiana

While Bourbon Street, jazz, voodoo, street musicians and good food are always available, the season has lengthy lulls when Mardi Gras-related activities are unavailable. How do you compensate for those down- times? You find that “extra adrenaline rush” by sampling everything that New Orleans has to offer over a single 24 hour period.

DOG MUSHING IN THE YUKON
Five dogs lurch forward with shocking fierceness, without one second of hesitation, throwing my city-soft body into shock. Frantically I grab for the crossbar with my mittened hands, raise one foot off the brake — a small spiked platform of snowmobile track — to a small, icy runner. The other foot tests the brake. A 61 year old woman…what was I doing?

THE TRINITY SITE - WHERE THE FIRST ATOMIC BOMB WAS EXPLODED
New Mexico

Declared a National Historic Landmark in 1975, the Trinity Site is near the north end of the Jornada del Muerto desert. This desert name often translates as “journey of the dead man,” the name the Spanish conquistadors gave to the 1660s northerly route from Mexico. The origin of the code name “Trinity” is uncertain.

TOSSING & TURNING WITH THE LEMP MANSION SPOOKS
St. Louis, Missouri

The thirty-three room mansion that is the focus of so much ghostly activity today was bought in 1876 by the Lemps. William’s daughter Hilda married Gustav Pabst of Milwaukee, creating a powerful beer alliance in 1897. But the good times for the Lemps were about to end, and tragedy would begin to assault the family.

EXPLORING OLD MONTREAL
Montreal, Quebec

I descend slowly into the dimly lit archeological site in the Old Port of Montreal. I am now below the ground level of the beautifully preserved Pointe-à-Callière Museum. As my eyes adjust to the light, the foundations of the formally standing Royal Insurance building (1861 – 1951) appear before me as an ancient maze.

SEARCHING FOR THE LAKE NORMAN MONSTER
North Carolina, USA

Loch Ness, Scotland. Lake Van, Turkey. Lake Hodges, California. Seljord Lake, Norway all have had reported sightings of monsters. North Carolina has its own alleged monster of the waterway called The Lake Norman Monster, or “Normie” to his close friends.

THE 2010 WINTER OLYMPICS
Vancouver, Canada

As Host City of the 2010 Winter Olympics and Paralympic Games, we Vancouverites will welcome the world this February. I’ve lived here most of my life and will share with you all the sights and attractions my city has to offer, including Vancouver’s colourful history.

WRITING-ON-STONE PROVINCIAL PARK
Alberta Canada

"The Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park" situates as the earth splits, cracking the dusty plains open to reveal layers of ancient geography—sandstone scrubbed by rain and wind and glacier and who knows what violent or persistent acts of nature.

SAILING THE MAINE COAST
Penobscot Bay Maine, USA

Imagine sailing the Maine coast on a schooner launched in 1871. The Stephen Taber, a historic landmark, has been sailing continuously for 138 years. Originally a cargo boat, it now takes up to 22 passengers on sailing adventures through Penobscot Bay.

CELEBRATING THE BIRTH OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Fort Langley, British Columbia Canada
Rain pours down and the chill creeps into my bones as I trudge up the hill, past a statue of James Douglas. I splash through the gate in the tall palisade at Fort Langley towards the Big House. I have come to participate in the 151st anniversary of the founding of British Columbia and the swearing-in of James Douglas as the colony’s first governor.

DANIEL BOONE’S FORT BOONESBOROUGH
Kentucky, USA

Fort Boonesborough became the second English-speaking settlement in this new land. It is a short walk from the parking lot to the fort, but once inside, the sounds, sights and smells instantly transported me back to an earlier and much simpler time.

CELEBRATING FRENCH-CANADIAN HERITAGE
Maillardville B.C.’s Festival Du Bois

It’s almost time for the evening show to go on and the enormous tent is already crammed to capacity. Long tables are set up, banquet style, occupied by hundreds of people, some of them sporting toques and sashes, some enjoying plates of French Canadian cuisine and a glass of beer or wine. The atmosphere is definitely festive.

GOLD ON SHOALWATER BAY
Oysterville, Washington

Today, tiny Oysterville is a National Historic District, and fresh oysters can still be found in Shoalwater (now Willapa) Bay. A number of small, family owned farms spurn the use of dredging a pesticides used by the larger corporations, and harvest fresh, deliciously organic oysters daily. My family and I visit Oysterville often, and we love everything about this tiny town that time forgot.

GOLD RUSH NARROW GAUGE
Skagway, Alaska

I arrived in Skagway by ship, as did so many adventurers on their quests after riches. My ship, of course, was one of several large cruise ships that arrive every day during Alaska’s short tourist season, not one of the picturesque, small steamers of the Klondike days. As do most of today’s travelers, I boarded my train on the dock, right alongside my ship.

AFRICA - THE CLIFFS OF BANDIAGARA
Bandiagara, Mali

Dogon Country denotes a region of roughly 400,000 hectares, following the Bandiagara Escarpment, an astonishing line of cliffs which climbs up to 500m at its highest points in 150 km. The stunning views from the top went for miles. Savannah went all the way to the horizon, or sand, or rock. The area felt at times impossibly remote, but it was one of Mali’s first tourist groups.

THE PEDDLERS OF THE HANGZHOU NIGHT MARKET
Hangzhou, China

It is the low season for tourism, so other than myself there are only a few westerners out this evening. Vendors beckon with cries of “Hello, hello!” and “CD, DVD!” They are relentless, thrusting cracked plates and crumbling vases in my face as they scream, “Ming Dynasty!”

WHERE PERSONAL AND FRONTIER HISTORY MERGE
Casper, Wyoming

The venues that travelers deem as either a neat place to visit or a waste of time and money are often spots where the dramas, the highs, and lows of another’s past may have played out, leaving imbedded memories. Such is the case for the venue of Casper, Wyoming, where I came of age in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

THE KING OF RAGTIME - SCOTT JOPLIN
St. Louis, Missouri USA

The only home where Scott Joplin ever lived that still stands is a humble yet handsome, brick, walk-up flat on Delmar Boulevard in St. Louis. It is open as a state historic site, serving both as a tribute to Joplin and perhaps the nation’s most significant monument to this truly American musical genre.

A CIVIL WAR CAMP ADVENTURE
Petersburg, Virginia

My husband John and I signed up for the Civil War Adventure Camp, part of the Pamplin Historical Park. I volunteered for the Army of the Potomac and John joined the Army of the Confederacy. Regardless of the visions of glory when enlisting, this quickly faded with the intensity of the training and experiencing the horror of war, albeit a ‘mock’ war.

THE GHOSTS OF SOUTHERN SASKATCHEWAN
Canada

Saskatchewan is crisscrossed with a myriad of highways so the choice of routes seemed endless. Old Wives appealed to me because of the legend I had heard surrounding its name. Many years ago there was an encampment of Cree at this site. Further away in the hills the Blackfoot were waiting to attack.

BURNABY HERITAGE VILLAGE
YE OLDE FASHIONED CHRISTMAS
British Columbia, Canada


Every December, Burnaby Heritage Village in Burnaby, B.C. Canada reopens for its heritage holiday schedule. Festively dressing up and entertaining guests with special activities, it’s an opportunity for visitors to rediscover the true meaning of Christmas. Entering this charming 1920’s village, families cross a bridge above a murmuring creek and step back to a simpler era.

NORTHWEST COMPANY FUR POST - A STEP BACK IN TIME
Minnesota, USA

Located along the Snake River, one and a half miles west of present-day Pine City in northern Minnesota, sits a recreated 1804 wintering fur post of the Northwest Company. During the early 1800s, the Northwest Company was expanding its number of fur posts to keep ahead of its competition, the XY Company.

TALES OF THE YUKON
The Yukon International Storytelling Festival

After two long hours thumbing for a ride outside the small Alaskan town of Skagway while holding a large cardboard flap reading “Whitehorse”, a small dusty car pulled over. It was the first chapter of my trip to Whitehorse’s annual and nineteenth Yukon storytelling festival.

EXPERIENCE THE HISTORY
Louisville, Kentucky

In Louisville, Kentucky, I found some of the city’s best gems using a variety of transport means, and in the process fulfilled one childhood wish. From flying in a classic biplane to riverboating on the Ohio River, my getting travel-intimate with this city was made all the more fun and adventurous.

WASHINGTON IRVING’S SPIRIT IS ALIVE AND WELL
Sleepy Hollow, NY

Literature fans who call New York State home are fortunate. Our country’s first internationally known author “wrote” his legacy in two of Gotham’s most lush spots
the Hudson Valley and the Catskill Mountains. Washington Irving (1783 – 1859) authored two of the most renowned tales in ALL of literature.

THE MYSTERY OF OUR HISTORY
Discovering Alert Bay, BC

When we descended the ferry at Alert Bay I looked around with anticipation. An elaborate gateway carved with ‘Namgis First Nation, Gilakas’la Welcome' greeted us. Down Front Street, which ran forever along the waterfront was the Namgis Burial Grounds dotted with numerous totem poles interspersed with a few crosses to mark the graves.

RIVERSIDE
Louisville, Kentucky USA

History is never lost when we experience places like Riverside. When you visit, let history surround you as you leisurely walk through each room of the home. Enjoy each moment of your walk over the grounds, the gardens, and the landing, allowing people and pieces of history to whisper to you what life was like long ago on the banks of the Ohio River in southwest Louisville, Kentucky.